Showing posts tagged with “advertising”

“I think the first responsibility is to acknowledge that there is power in those images, that there is power in advertising, magazine covers, that there is power in that and that there is thought to that, that there are people who’ve dedicated their lives to understanding how people will have an emotional, intellectual response to an image, to a sound, to a voice. That is what they have studied, and that his what they’re getting paid six-figure salaries to do, if not seven figures. And that to then pretend that all that knowledge means nothing, that they are servants of the people and only reflecting back what people want is utterly ridiculous.”

— Douglas Kearney from Dark Girls

Natives do experience the covertness of color-blind racism that limits life opportunities. Under the logic of colorblind racism, if I don’t make as much money as a white woman who does the same job, it’s because I’m not as experienced or competent. If Natives, on average, have less college attainment, it’s has nothing to do with the 500+ years of internal colonization and genocide or the eras of removal, relocation, reservation internment, and forced boarding school attendance. It’s because Indians are lazy drunks. No thought is given to historical context or constrained opportunities. Race scholars admit that marginalized groups still experience inequality, but argue that racism is expressed increasingly without direct racist terminology.

But this certainly does not hold true for Indigenous Peoples in the U.S. We also routinely experience overt racism in the form of racial epithets like redskin, injun or squaw and horribly distorted depictions of Natives as mascots, reminiscent of the propaganda used against black, Irish and Jewish people in the 19th and 20th centuries. And this overt racism is not confined to hate groups, but is visible in everyday communication and throughout the media….

While minstrel shows have long been criticized as racist, American children are still socialized into playing Indian. Columbus Day celebrations, Halloween costumes, and Thanksgiving reenactments stereotype Indigenous Peoples as one big distorted culture. We are relegated to racist stereotypes and cultural caricatures.

Why is racism against Natives hardly recognized or pointed out by non-Native people, especially non-Native scholars?

— Dwanna L. Robertson, “Playing ‘Indian’ and Color-Blind Racism” (via blackinasia)

(Source: owning-my-truth)

“It also pays for the weight-loss industry to have us believe that weight has negative health consequences, as is evident from the enormous resources that the pharmaceutical industry has put behind the research that exaggerates the health risks associated with weight. Knoll Pharmaceuticals, for example, offers funding to those who ‘advance the understanding of obesity as a major health problem,’ as they explicitly state in a call for proposals. After mobilizing concern about obesity, they can profit by selling the cure.”

“Attraction is not just about a feeling. It’s a heavily mediated experience and part of an industry that pumps billions into creating images of what women should look like. It can be hard to decipher what you are attracted to versus what you have internalized as attractive. This goes for both how we see ourselves and how we see others, and it leaves a lot of room to fester for some really messed up ideology about size, race, and sexuality. White standards of beauty get conflated with romantic ideals and create Cinderella-esque ideas of what romantic femininity should look like, all serving to uphold a certain standard of beauty. This impacts our self-esteem, the kind of energy we put out there, the types of people that are drawn to us, and ultimately who we end up dating.”

— Samhita Mukhopadhyay (via wretchedoftheearth)

“I swear to god I will lose my mind if I hear the “sex sells” fallacy one more time. Sex does not sell. If sex sold, we would see penises where we see boobs. Naked men would be on everything that naked women are on. Sex isn’t what they’re selling you. They’re selling you an impossible, pornographically fueled misogynistic idea of the perfect woman.”

— (via littlelightx)

“I believe that in part, advertising’s success rests on its ability to reinforce generalisations around race, gender and ethnicity which can be entertaining, sometimes true, and sometimes horrifying, but which at a core level are a reflection of the way culture views itself or its aspirations.”

— Hank Willis Thomas (via blackcontemporaryart)

(Source: yegit)

grainnemcmahon:


Interesting.
My first thought on reading this post on Sociological Images was that there is a racial element and that advertisers are depending on some sort of white superiority and reluctance to buy “non-white” food (tortillas are featured heavily in Mexican foods while wraps are generically “white” food). That’s a disgusting ploy, of course, but this is capitalism.  Some of the comments on Socioloigical Images suggest that this is gendered advertising (i.e. wraps are feminine and tortillias are masculine and if women are still doing most of the food shopping etc. etc.). The second explanation is not as  immediately likely to me (though there are traditionally “male”/ “female” foods) but there’s probably something in it.


John did some sleuthing and discovered that the bag of wraps cost 26¢ more than the tortillas.  Moreover, since there were only 6 wraps in the package of wraps, but 8 tortillas in the package of tortillas, each wrap cost 19¢ more than each tortilla.
So, there is an interesting marketing story here.


View post.

grainnemcmahon:

Interesting.

My first thought on reading this post on Sociological Images was that there is a racial element and that advertisers are depending on some sort of white superiority and reluctance to buy “non-white” food (tortillas are featured heavily in Mexican foods while wraps are generically “white” food). That’s a disgusting ploy, of course, but this is capitalism.  Some of the comments on Socioloigical Images suggest that this is gendered advertising (i.e. wraps are feminine and tortillias are masculine and if women are still doing most of the food shopping etc. etc.). The second explanation is not as  immediately likely to me (though there are traditionally “male”/ “female” foods) but there’s probably something in it.

John did some sleuthing and discovered that the bag of wraps cost 26¢ more than the tortillas.  Moreover, since there were only 6 wraps in the package of wraps, but 8 tortillas in the package of tortillas, each wrap cost 19¢ more than each tortilla.

So, there is an interesting marketing story here.

View post.

ad-busting:

When you say “We believe that hotness comes in all shapes” directly in your ad, you  better walk the talk. If you REALLY believed that, you would use models with diverse body types.

ad-busting:

When you say “We believe that hotness comes in all shapes” directly in your ad, you  better walk the talk. If you REALLY believed that, you would use models with diverse body types.

ad-busting:

Thanks to morphemes for submitting this terrible ad that I busted with joy. 

15 and under?  WTF

ad-busting:

Thanks to morphemes for submitting this terrible ad that I busted with joy. 

15 and under?  WTF


The over-sexualization of faucets. Yes, that actually exists.

The over-sexualization of faucets. Yes, that actually exists.

(Source: ad-busting)

purogallopinto:

This year, I decided to focus on brand logos and advertising at San Francisco Pride. It amazes me how much corporate sponsorship goes into putting this event together. The Pride festival is essentially a giant marketing campaign for these companies. While these companies may be in support of their queer employees, their main purpose is to advertise and get us to associate with their products (and with how “progressive” they are). 

I find this to be really interesting.  It’s been a long time since I’ve looked through a LGBT magazine, but from what I remember the ads were always overtly sexual.  I always felt it was done differently than in magazines for straight people.  I could be completely wrong though.  The slogan on the DirecTV ad is what made me think of that.

“The average TV commercial of sixty seconds has one hundred and twenty half-second clips in it, or one-third of a second. We bombard people with sensation. That substitutes for thinking.”

Ray Bradbury, “Fahrenheit 451” (via rethinkcapitalism)

“The pharmaceutical industry has been very successful in marketing psychotropic drugs to physicians and the public. From 1996 to 2005, the drug industry tripled its spending on marketing, including a fivefold increase in direct-to-consumer advertising. Several studies have found that prescription drug ads don’t adequately explain side effects and can adversely affect decisions by patients and doctors. In one study, American patients were more than twice as likely to request advertised drugs than patients in Canada, where most direct-to-consumer advertising is prohibited. Patients who requested advertised drugs were nearly 17 times more likely to receive one or more new prescriptions than patients who did not request any drugs.”

Inappropriate PrescribingMonitor on Psychology, June 2012 (via phxpsyd)

“The advertising industry exists to ensure it becomes culturally and emotionally impossible to refuse.”